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Beds to be moved out of John Radcliffe trauma unit over fire safety concerns

Grace Witherden

Grace Witherden

Beds to be moved out of John Radcliffe trauma unit over fire safety concerns

Part of the trauma unit at Oxford's John Radcliffe Hospital will be closed for up to 12 months following safety concerns in the wake of the Grenfell Tower tragedy.

The hospital plans to move 52 beds from the unit following a report about fire safety.

John Radcliffe is one of 27 major trauma centres in the country and seriously injured patients from across the Thames Valley are taken there for treatment.

Following the tragic fire at Grenfell Tower, which has led to the deaths of at least 80 people, a risk assessment was carried out on the cladding on buildings on four main Oxfordshire hospital sites.

The report, written by Trenton Fire, made a number of recommendations that the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundations Trust (OUH) will need to put in place to improve fire safety, which include replacing the cladding.

During the closure, 52 beds will be moved to wards within the hospital and the move is set to take place on Friday, August 4.

The ground floor outpatient clinic area can remain open for patient use, and the upper floors will be safe to use as office and storage space.

Dr Bruno Holthof, chief executive of Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust said: "Our highest priority is the patients in our care and our staff who are dedicated in their care for those patients. In common with many other organisations with public buildings, the Trust has been reviewing its fire safety procedures and systems following the tragic events in London. We will implement any changes necessary to ensure that our patients are safe.”

*The headline of this article has been amended to clarify beds will be moved to other wards and part of the building will remain open.

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