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Kindertransport musical to be performed at Maidenhead Synagogue

A musical tale of Jewish children’s journey to the safety of the UK from Nazi occupied Czechoslovakia will be performed at Maidenhead Synagogue next month.

Youngsters from the Grenfell Lodge synagogue’s choir and acting group have come together to put on the world’s fifth production of Last Train to Tomorrow in a sold-out show.

The musical narrative tells the story of the Czech ‘Kindertransport’, a rescue operation for Jewish children set up in Prague by the late Sir Nicholas Winton, who lived in Maidenhead.

Sir Nicholas, who has a statue at Maidenhead Train Station, helped transport and find foster families for more than 600 Czech children.

The music was written by renowned composer Carl Davis who lives in Windsor.

Carl, originally from New York, says the upcoming Maidenhead performance will be

the first production to be performed in a synagogue.

Producer Diz Adlemann says rehearsals with the youngsters aged seven to 15 have been going well.

“I think they’ve been amazing, they’re very excited,” Diz said.

“They loved the dressing up as it brings it to life for them.”

Some parents will also play roles in the performance.

The show’s four performances in May have all sold out, with 50 per cent of buyers coming from outside the Jewish community.

The play’s musical director John Dunston said: “It’s so exciting to work with these children who are so talented.

“They are really understanding of what it was like for these children to come from Central Europe, leaving their parents behind.”

John’s father helped transport about 350 Jewish children from Austria to Great Britain during the Nazi regime.

Last Train to Tomorrow will be performed on May 17 and 18 and twice on May 20.

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