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Remember When: Bells back at St Michael's and ex-servicemen paid respects

Welcome to Remember When, our weekly delve into the Advertiser archives to see what was making headlines 25, 30, 35, 40 and 50 years ago this week. You can also take a look into the past by visiting our online archives at baylismediaarchive.co.uk


1980: Newlands School’s hockey team was planning a tour of the eastern United States – and had already raised £3,000 to pay its expenses (main photo).

The team and two teachers were due to spend a fortnight in the USA, staying in private homes.


1985: The silent Sunday mornings at St Michael’s Church in Bray would soon be over after the church bells returned.

The bells had been at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry since June, where they underwent a restoration.

Pupils from Holyport Primary School were among those to line up to see the first of the eight huge bells arrive back at St Michael’s.


1985: Headteacher Violet Long reported another successful year for exams at Maidenhead College’s prize day.

Among those to be singled out for praise were Charlotte Wisley, who was going on to study at medical school, and Helen Taylor, the first student to embark on a degree course for medical physics.


1990: Courthouse School pupil Robert Bennett started a Stop the Chop club to help save the rainforests.

Robert, seven, and his school friends made 24 posters to get their message across.

They also wanted Maidonians to become more aware of their surroundings and take care of local trees.


1990: Those who lost their lives in the two world wars were remembered at one of the largest Remembrance Day gatherings Maidenhead had seen.

Ex-servicemen, civic dignitaries and representatives of 22 uniformed organisations attended the service at the war memorial in St Ives Road before it continued at St Mary’s Church.


1995: Dismayed shopkeepers near to the Bear Hotel in Maidenhead High Street were complaining that adjustments to the town centre traffic flow were taking away their trade.

The lower part of the High Street was turned into a one-way only area with on-street parking spaces and a loading bay.

Businesses there and in Moorbridge Road and Bridge Street said the move meant they were isolated from the rest of the town’s shopping centre.


1995: The ’Tiser Terrors were gearing up to compete in the Sporting Cracker Challenge at the Magnet Leisure Centre.

The newspaper’s team was taking part in the It’s A Knockout-style tournament, which raised money for the Advertiser’s Cracker Appeal.

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