POLL: Should the new Crossrail trains have toilets?


Staff reporter

comments 6
POLL: Should the new Crossrail trains have toilets?

Photo courtesy of Transport for London



I'm undecided

The first of a new fleet of Crossrail trains took to the test track last week — but a few of our readers feel the service is missing one important feature.

Once launched, the new trains will be able to hold up to 1,500 passengers and will be equipped with air conditioning, walk-through carriages and real-time travel information. They will not, however, have toilets.

Readers have taken to our Facebook page to discuss the lack of facilities, with Gareth Ebenezer quipping: "The Government is spending record amounts on upgrading the rail network for Crossrail, but you won't be able to spend a penny on board."

Others have argued the move will free up more space on board and the existing London Underground network works without having toilets on trains.

Vote in our poll and let us know your thoughts in the comments (but watch the toilet humour).


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  • Symposium

    13:01, 19 August 2016

    @trainwatcher - the comparison between the Metropolitan and Elizabeth tube lines is completely fair. You do know the Met line goes to Chesham, don't you? That proves that toilets aren't essential on the trains, as long as there's a suitable alternative in the station. I'd happily agree with a campaign to ensure that's ensured, but on board, it's capacity we need, as anyone who commutes regularly to London will attest.



  • trainwatcher

    11:11, 19 August 2016

    Toilets on Crossrail are essential. The trains are designed to be fitted with toilets, but the penny-pinchers have put money before customer convenience. Anybody coming home on a late night train will be accustomed to seeing a queue outside the toilet on the train - people need loos! Comparison with the Underground is not completely fair, as the journeys are longer for the outer parts of the line; station toilets are often closed especially in the evenings. And If a train gets stuck, as happens all too often, the need to loo can be unbearable, especially for men and women of a certain age. This mean decision needs to be reversed urgently.



  • Symposium

    10:10, 05 August 2016

    The contract for the trains has already been signed and as this article states, they're starting to roll off the production line, so the horse has already bolted. Anyway, the Metropolitan line seems to manage perfectly fine without toilets on the train, so I don't see why the Elizabeth line should be any different.



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